This Week in Tech: Fall Back Edition

With Halloween in the rearview mirror, SHIFTers are getting ready for the fall conference season, 2020 campaign planning and looking forward to our annual SHIFTgiving potluck. Here is some of the news that caught our attention this week – and don’t forget to turn your clocks back an hour on Saturday night!

Twitter bans political ads  

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced on Wednesday that the platform would not accept any political ads as we lead into the 2020 election cycle. Tweeting, “We’ve made the decision to stop all political advertising on Twitter globally. We believe political message reach should be earned, not bought,” Dorsey has upped the pressure on other social platforms – most notably Facebook – to make similar moves to address “unchecked misleading information and deep fakes.”

Twitter timed the announcement to coincide with Facebook’s earnings call, during which Mark Zuckerberg confirmed the company’s stance that it was not in the content moderation business. It remains to be seen whether public and political pressure will prompt Zuckerberg to reverse this position.

WeWork woes continue

For the latest in the WeWork saga, head over to The Information, where founder Jessica Lessin shared her hot take on the role of the failing startup’s bankers in the company’s downward spiral.  While former CEO Adam Neumann and Softbank have gotten deserved criticism from the media, Lessin wonders why the bankers behind WeWork’s abandoned IPO, JP Morgan and Goldman Sachs have mostly avoided the fallout writing “How did they contribute to the overhyping of the company and the fuzzy accounting that investors ultimately balked at, killing the IPO and resulting in thousands losing their jobs?”

A look ahead

We still have two months left in 2019, but industry pundits are already looking into the future with predictions for 2020. This week, IDC laid out the 10 technologies that the analyst firm believes will have an impact next year. Not surprisingly, the buzzword “Digital Transformation” looms large in the firm’s analysis, with an expected 50 percent of IT spending going toward the category by 2023. “Digital transformation involves using technology to improve business operations, which often means modernizing or replacing legacy technologies,” the firm said.

TechRepublic reported the top technologies IDC believes will fuel this transformation include empowered edge devices, connected private / public / hybrid clouds, specialized and proprietary applications, artificial intelligence, the concept of trust in enterprise security and cross industry mashups. None of these predictions goes out on a limb, and most are concepts that have been discussed for years. Will 2020 be the year that they finally gain widespread adoption? Only time will tell.

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