Category Archive for: Analytics

What Facebook Dislikes Could Mean for Data-Driven Marketers

The Internet is abuzz with Facebook’s latest ‘innovation’, the dislike button (or something like it). Despite CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s fervent wish that it not be used to turn Facebook into a troll haven of downvotes, there’s a good chance that some users will use it expressly for that purpose. Says Zuckerberg via CNBC: ‘”People have…

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How to measure understanding with Google Analytics

During our INBOUND15 talk on How to Measure the Value of PR in the 21st Century, one audience member raised this fascinating question: “How do you measure understanding, and where does it fit in the PR funnel?” Understanding and comprehension are an integral part of purchase consideration, to be sure. However, understanding is not something…

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New eBook: Google Analytics Basics for PR Pros

Leads are important. Sales are important. Think PR has nothing to do with either one? Think again. PR may not have the ability to directly impact sales, but it can help. Google Analytics can show you how. We’ve stressed, time and time again, on this blog how important measuring results and the impact of PR…

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Getting a READ on social media influencers

Influencers is an incredibly nebulous term, yet it’s a focus for so many PR programs. Who is influential? What constitutes influence? While we could have lengthy philosophical debates about the nature of influence from Aristotle to today, such discussions tend not to give us operational frameworks for getting work done. Compounding our confusion about who…

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Fix Google Analytics Referral Spam

Attention Google Analytics: you have a problem that desperately needs your attention. Referral spam is getting out of control and messing with the data we gather for ourselves and our clients. That valuable data is used to make business decisions, and referral spam is affecting that data. While we wait for a permanent solution from Google, we’ve…

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Why automated sentiment analysis is broken and how to fix it

One of the most difficult challenges reporting and analytics face in public relations measurement is sentiment analysis. Machines attempt textual analysis of sentiment all the time; more often than not, it goes horribly wrong. How does it go wrong? Machines are incapable of understanding context. Here’s why. Machines are typically programmed to look for certain…

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Does social media sharing matter?

On virtually every site you visit on the Internet, you’ll find social media sharing icons. Share! Pin! Tweet! Like! Do these activities matter? Does all of that sharing create any kind of tangible benefit for the site? Instinct would say yes, but we cannot run a marketing department on instinct alone. To answer this question,…

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Should you stop using hashtags in social media content?

Do hashtags matter? This is a question asked recently by Patrick Coffee of PR Newser at AdWeek. Should social media managers be skipping the hashtag? Rather than guess, let’s take a data-driven approach. Before we dig in, a bit on our methodology. SHIFT examined the social media engagement of posts from the Fortune 10 companies…

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How to use Twitter Audience Insights for Marketing

Twitter just rolled out its Audience Insights tool to all Twitter Analytics and Ads users. How can it benefit your marketing and communications program? What It Tells You Inside Twitter’s Audience Insights, you’ll find some very familiar data points, assuming you’ve worked with other demographics tools. Currently, you can broadly look at all Twitter users…

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The Top 5 Skills That Young (And All) Communicators Should Develop

One of the more enjoyable elements of being an executive in communications today is that my work brings me into contact with a wide variety of individuals. Whether it’s participating in webinars, interacting with people online, or speaking at industry, company or academic events, I meet people who are at varying levels of comfort with…

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